Newmanology

Apr 23

Are iPad Magazine Apps Dead?
A state of the art roundtable, featuring five top magazine and app creators. Here’s a sample excerpt:
How will the magazine app publishing scene be different a year from now? Will we be having an “apps are back!” roundtable next year?
Josh Klenert (former creative director of the Huffington magazine app): My best guess is that there will be bigger shifts on the business side that will allow for more scale. Platforms like Zinio, ISSUU, and Next Issue will reach massive scale with ecosystems to consume magazine content no matter where users are will thrive. Think of YouTube for videos. Videos can be watched on YouTube or be embedded anywhere. Publishing ecosystems that don’t allow for this will disappear.
Big publishers may go the way of the music industry and start to unbundle content (think singles vs. full albums) — possibly with a fremium model. Content a user consumes will become more passively personalized for the user. Its like adding elements of a personalized Flipboard-like experience which shows the content you are most interested in. For example, I read lots of movie reviews from Entertainment Weekly; well then I should start to see more entertainment content from Time appear in my magazine. I bookmark a story about summer suits in GQ; well then I should start to see more fashion content from Details appear. These apps need to ultimately become native to their digital platforms and evolve into utilities that people go to on a daily basis. In order to do this, like the web before it, the direct connection to a printed publication cycle needs to be broken.
Read the whole conversation here.

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Are iPad Magazine Apps Dead?

A state of the art roundtable, featuring five top magazine and app creators. Here’s a sample excerpt:

How will the magazine app publishing scene be different a year from now? Will we be having an “apps are back!” roundtable next year?

Josh Klenert (former creative director of the Huffington magazine app): My best guess is that there will be bigger shifts on the business side that will allow for more scale. Platforms like Zinio, ISSUU, and Next Issue will reach massive scale with ecosystems to consume magazine content no matter where users are will thrive. Think of YouTube for videos. Videos can be watched on YouTube or be embedded anywhere. Publishing ecosystems that don’t allow for this will disappear.

Big publishers may go the way of the music industry and start to unbundle content (think singles vs. full albums) — possibly with a fremium model. Content a user consumes will become more passively personalized for the user. Its like adding elements of a personalized Flipboard-like experience which shows the content you are most interested in. For example, I read lots of movie reviews from Entertainment Weekly; well then I should start to see more entertainment content from Time appear in my magazine. I bookmark a story about summer suits in GQ; well then I should start to see more fashion content from Details appear. These apps need to ultimately become native to their digital platforms and evolve into utilities that people go to on a daily basis. In order to do this, like the web before it, the direct connection to a printed publication cycle needs to be broken.

Read the whole conversation here.

My review of the latest Billboard magazine cover, featuring Enrique Iglesias, via Folio online: “This is a cover design that recognizes the multiplatform, viral, instantaneous nature of the times.” 

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My review of the latest Billboard magazine cover, featuring Enrique Iglesias, via Folio online: “This is a cover design that recognizes the multiplatform, viral, instantaneous nature of the times.” 

Are iPad Magazine Apps Dead?
A state of the art roundtable, featuring five top magazine and app creators. Here’s a sample excerpt:
Is there a future for people interested in creating apps?
Joe Zeff of Joe Zeff Design: There is enormous potential for those with entrepreneurial spirit, as the playing field is flat. Large publishers have few advantages over individual designers when it comes to creating content for tablets. In fact, the burdens placed on publishers to support mulitplatform ubiquity give individuals and small studios a decisive edge. Our latest project, Spies of Mississippi: The Appumentary, started with a blank sheet of paper, not a mandate to create weekly or monthly issues on five different platforms. If you approach app work as production work, then that’s all it will be. If you approach apps as a way to deliver immersive, intuitive multitouch experiences that leverage the capabilities of tablet computers, you may just change the world.
Read the whole conversation here.

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Are iPad Magazine Apps Dead?

A state of the art roundtable, featuring five top magazine and app creators. Here’s a sample excerpt:

Is there a future for people interested in creating apps?

Joe Zeff of Joe Zeff Design: There is enormous potential for those with entrepreneurial spirit, as the playing field is flat. Large publishers have few advantages over individual designers when it comes to creating content for tablets. In fact, the burdens placed on publishers to support mulitplatform ubiquity give individuals and small studios a decisive edge. Our latest project, Spies of Mississippi: The Appumentary, started with a blank sheet of paper, not a mandate to create weekly or monthly issues on five different platforms. If you approach app work as production work, then that’s all it will be. If you approach apps as a way to deliver immersive, intuitive multitouch experiences that leverage the capabilities of tablet computers, you may just change the world.

Read the whole conversation here.

[video]

The Chocolate War Magazine!
Found at the Frederick Douglass Houses on Columbus Avenue in NYC

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The Chocolate War Magazine!

Found at the Frederick Douglass Houses on Columbus Avenue in NYC

Apr 22

Are Magazine Apps Dead? A state of the art roundtable featuring Jeremy Leslie, Joe Zeff, Josh Klenert, Mario Garcia, and David Jacobs. Josh Klenert on why readers have not embraced magazine apps in large numbers: “We’ve learned over the last 20 years of publishing on the web, that to gain scale you need to leverage search and social to build an audience. It’s not true that “if you build it, they will come.” The same is true for apps. Right now, they are a destination. If a user connects with your brand, they will come, consume, and hopefully return. For example, with our HuffPost news app, we see that it’s a destination that sees more page views per visitor versus mobile web, but mobile web sees more unique users. But this is for a news product that is updated hundreds of times a day, not a weekly or monthly publication that lands with a thud. Those weekly/monthly publications then just sit in the Newsstand collecting dust in between updates while users move on to products that embrace the always-connected digital platform; ones that simply provide more stuff more often. I certainly don’t think you can blame the tablets themselves. You can’t argue with the vast number of iPads or Android tablets sold or apps downloaded (and used), and it’s not the usability of the iPad either. How many times have you seen a two year old flawlessly zip around on an iPad?”
Read the full story here.

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Are Magazine Apps Dead? A state of the art roundtable featuring Jeremy Leslie, Joe Zeff, Josh Klenert, Mario Garcia, and David Jacobs.

Josh Klenert on why readers have not embraced magazine apps in large numbers:

“We’ve learned over the last 20 years of publishing on the web, that to gain scale you need to leverage search and social to build an audience. It’s not true that “if you build it, they will come.” The same is true for apps. Right now, they are a destination. If a user connects with your brand, they will come, consume, and hopefully return. For example, with our HuffPost news app, we see that it’s a destination that sees more page views per visitor versus mobile web, but mobile web sees more unique users. But this is for a news product that is updated hundreds of times a day, not a weekly or monthly publication that lands with a thud. Those weekly/monthly publications then just sit in the Newsstand collecting dust in between updates while users move on to products that embrace the always-connected digital platform; ones that simply provide more stuff more often. I certainly don’t think you can blame the tablets themselves. You can’t argue with the vast number of iPads or Android tablets sold or apps downloaded (and used), and it’s not the usability of the iPad either. How many times have you seen a two year old flawlessly zip around on an iPad?”

Read the full story here.

richardturley:

Some sort of goodbye letter
Four years ago, almost to the day, the redesigned Bloomberg Businessweek arrived on newsstands. The distance from that point to this seems to have passed within the blink of an eye, and has been one of the best and most unexpected adventures I’ve ever had. 
The risk Bloomberg took in hiring someone from another continent, with limited experience and little or no knowledge of business magazines struck me as brave at the time. What I didn’t realize then was that it wasn’t really bravery – more just a desire to not follow the conventional wisdom of what our magazine could be. 
That principle is the result of the people here, exemplified most notably by Josh. Hands down the best boss and editor I have ever worked for, but also and more importantly - my partner in crime, and someone who deserves far more credit for the design of the magazine than he ever allows himself to receive. I will miss him forever. But that spirit of adventure and experimentation that starts with him, runs throughout. No more so than within the art department, who so often pushed me far more than I ever pushed them; and who have an ambition I haven’t found anywhere else. 
The point of this isn’t some sort of self-aggrandizing nostalgia trip (but hey, screw it, maybe that’s exactly what this is), but a chance for me to say thank you; to everyone at Bloomberg, Josh of course, but specifically to Cindy and David, Tracy, Rob, Emily and Emily, Chris, Jaci, Chandra, Shawn, Lee, Evan, Alis, Meagan, Donna, Diana, Dorothy, Jane, Jennifer, Allison, Maayan, Kristin, Brad, Bryant, Ellen, Bryan, Jim, Chris, Eric, Emma, Kurt, Mark, Susan, Ken, David,  Karen, Norm, Jim, Lisa, Justin, Marc, Zazie, Katie, Caroline…  SO MANY MORE PEOPLE. 
Bloomberg is a place where design matters, and never more so than now, as our design thinking is being integrated all over the business. This is a good time to be here. To take what we’ve done so far, push it forward, and improve it. 
So why am I leaving? Well, after writing all this, I’m wondering the same thing.. but it’s time for me to learn something new and work with different content for a different audience. MTV has always created culture and ideas that define generations. The opportunity to work with animators, video artists, journalists, designers, musicians, artists - creating content, creating culture, for an audience as big as MTV’s is really exciting. Plus, it turns out there comes a time when your son’s approval of you becomes as - if not more - important than your approval of him. Apropos of that, promising him a ticket for the VMAs seems to have gone down well. (MTV doesn’t know about this yet. Please don’t tell them).
So farewell. Goodbye. So long. Bye. See you later. I’m going now. Yeah.. nearly there. Definitly going now. I’m off. See ya. Yup, I’m going. Haven’t quite left yet. Walking out. Now. Bye. Actually I’m around till Thursday. Just want to draw this out a bit longer. OK. That’s it.



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richardturley:

Some sort of goodbye letter

Four years ago, almost to the day, the redesigned Bloomberg Businessweek arrived on newsstands. The distance from that point to this seems to have passed within the blink of an eye, and has been one of the best and most unexpected adventures I’ve ever had. 

The risk Bloomberg took in hiring someone from another continent, with limited experience and little or no knowledge of business magazines struck me as brave at the time. What I didn’t realize then was that it wasn’t really bravery – more just a desire to not follow the conventional wisdom of what our magazine could be. 

That principle is the result of the people here, exemplified most notably by Josh. Hands down the best boss and editor I have ever worked for, but also and more importantly - my partner in crime, and someone who deserves far more credit for the design of the magazine than he ever allows himself to receive. I will miss him forever. But that spirit of adventure and experimentation that starts with him, runs throughout. No more so than within the art department, who so often pushed me far more than I ever pushed them; and who have an ambition I haven’t found anywhere else. 

The point of this isn’t some sort of self-aggrandizing nostalgia trip (but hey, screw it, maybe that’s exactly what this is), but a chance for me to say thank you; to everyone at Bloomberg, Josh of course, but specifically to Cindy and David, Tracy, Rob, Emily and Emily, Chris, Jaci, Chandra, Shawn, Lee, Evan, Alis, Meagan, Donna, Diana, Dorothy, Jane, Jennifer, Allison, Maayan, Kristin, Brad, Bryant, Ellen, Bryan, Jim, Chris, Eric, Emma, Kurt, Mark, Susan, Ken, David,  Karen, Norm, Jim, Lisa, Justin, Marc, Zazie, Katie, Caroline…  SO MANY MORE PEOPLE. 

Bloomberg is a place where design matters, and never more so than now, as our design thinking is being integrated all over the business. This is a good time to be here. To take what we’ve done so far, push it forward, and improve it. 

So why am I leaving? Well, after writing all this, I’m wondering the same thing.. but it’s time for me to learn something new and work with different content for a different audience. MTV has always created culture and ideas that define generations. The opportunity to work with animators, video artists, journalists, designers, musicians, artists - creating content, creating culture, for an audience as big as MTV’s is really exciting. Plus, it turns out there comes a time when your son’s approval of you becomes as - if not more - important than your approval of him. Apropos of that, promising him a ticket for the VMAs seems to have gone down well. (MTV doesn’t know about this yet. Please don’t tell them).

So farewell. Goodbye. So long. Bye. See you later. I’m going now. Yeah.. nearly there. Definitly going now. I’m off. See ya. Yup, I’m going. Haven’t quite left yet. Walking out. Now. Bye. Actually I’m around till Thursday. Just want to draw this out a bit longer. OK. That’s it.

Fox Style, “A Positive Black Film” (1973)
Source: Wrong Side of the Art!

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Fox Style, “A Positive Black Film” (1973)

Source: Wrong Side of the Art!

Apr 21

babylonfalling:

We, the undersigned



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babylonfalling:

We, the undersigned

Whatnauts on the Rocks (1972) LP cover
See 1000s more vintage soul and R&B classic LP covers at Mr. Moo’s LP Covers Corner

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Whatnauts on the Rocks (1972) LP cover

See 1000s more vintage soul and R&B classic LP covers at Mr. Moo’s LP Covers Corner