The new Gym Class Magazine

Gym Class Magazine, “the magazine about magazines,” is out with a new issue. Edited and designed by Steven Gregor, Gym Class is described by Magculture as “a gloriously mad 32-page psychedelic comic book format featuring commissioned illustrations and as much CMYK as the Newspaper Club can squeegee into their mini format.” Inside are power-packed interviews with Italian magazine art directors Kuchar Swara (Casa da Abitare), Francesco Franchi (Il), and David Moretti (Wired Italia), Letter to Jane‘s Tim Moore on digital magazines, a look at Eureka, a science magazine supplement produced by The Times of London, an interview I did with Fortune creative director Brandon Kavulla, and more. It’s a smart, fun, obsessive magazine, truly essential for magazine makers of all kinds. The CMYK-heavy design is splashy and bold, and the comic book size format is a joy to hold.

Part of the fun of Gym Class has been that its format has changed from issue to issue, from heavy-stock newspaper to digital-only to this new compact size (it’s the same size and paper stock as the My Favo(u)rite Magazine project). And the design continues to evolve and get more detailed and sophisticated. Other issues of Gym Class have had more material, but pound for pound issue #10 is my favorite to date. This is truly a publication with a passionate love for magazines, that reminds us all how exciting and compelling those magazines can be.

Gym Class Magazine is available exclusively from Magculture.

(A portion of the proceeds from the sale of Gym Class Magazine #10 are going to the Friends of Bob Newman fundraising effort.)

Here’s an excerpt from the interview I did with former Wired creative director (and now Fortune creative director) Brandon Kavulla, for the new issue of Gym Class Magazine. Brandon has some smart things to say about the future of magazines! Find out more about Gym Class Magazine and get copies at Magculture.Robert Newman: Where do you think print magazines will be in five years?Brandon Kavulla: I think it’s pretty easy to predict what’s going to happen or, rather, what is happening. You just have to look at similar industries—like the music business—and then also note the trajectory of most technology. Also, distribution has always dictated the physical medium. We printed stories on paper, stapled them and mailed them out because that was the quickest way to get the information to the largest number of people. Additionally, magazines are monthly, bi-monthly or weekly, primarily because of print production reasons. Another comparison to the record industry, I think the monthly, bi-monthly or weekly format will eventually be as irrelevant as the vinyl record terminology of A-side and B-side. If you look at technology… say, letterpress, silkscreen, cassette tapes, vinyl, various kinds of cameras or photographic processes, etc… they all follow a similar pattern: The New Innovative Technology > The Industry Standard > Outdated/Obsolete > Fine Art/Bespoke. Like getting your business cards letter pressed or a band having a special vinyl edition of their album, I think magazines will eventually be considered luxury extensions of brands: “Oh, you have a print edition! Fancy.” And this is already happening. One area that is doing very well in print is the luxury market. An interesting quote from a piece in The New York Times: “In luxury, paper is still king,” said Samir Husni, a journalism professor at the University of Mississippi who tracks new magazines. “These advertisers (Chanel, Cartier, Porsche) view digital editions as a very disposable thing. You wave your hand and it’s gone.” We’re at a moment of massive redefinition of what the metrics of a successful title, issue or story are. Technology will only get cheaper, faster, thinner, more mobile. And it’s good to remember that one day our iPads will seem like Atari systems to our kids.
Excerpted from Gym Class Magazine #10, available here.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview I did with former Wired creative director (and now Fortune creative director) Brandon Kavulla, for the new issue of Gym Class Magazine. Brandon has some smart things to say about the future of magazines! Find out more about Gym Class Magazine and get copies at Magculture.

Robert Newman: Where do you think print magazines will be in five years?

Brandon Kavulla: I think it’s pretty easy to predict what’s going to happen or, rather, what is happening. You just have to look at similar industries—like the music business—and then also note the trajectory of most technology. Also, distribution has always dictated the physical medium. We printed stories on paper, stapled them and mailed them out because that was the quickest way to get the information to the largest number of people. Additionally, magazines are monthly, bi-monthly or weekly, primarily because of print production reasons. Another comparison to the record industry, I think the monthly, bi-monthly or weekly format will eventually be as irrelevant as the vinyl record terminology of A-side and B-side.

If you look at technology… say, letterpress, silkscreen, cassette tapes, vinyl, various kinds of cameras or photographic processes, etc… they all follow a similar pattern:

The New Innovative Technology > The Industry Standard > Outdated/Obsolete > Fine Art/Bespoke. Like getting your business cards letter pressed or a band having a special vinyl edition of their album, I think magazines will eventually be considered luxury extensions of brands: “Oh, you have a print edition! Fancy.” And this is already happening. One area that is doing very well in print is the luxury market. An interesting quote from a piece in The New York Times: “In luxury, paper is still king,” said Samir Husni, a journalism professor at the University of Mississippi who tracks new magazines. “These advertisers (Chanel, Cartier, Porsche) view digital editions as a very disposable thing. You wave your hand and it’s gone.” We’re at a moment of massive redefinition of what the metrics of a successful title, issue or story are. Technology will only get cheaper, faster, thinner, more mobile. And it’s good to remember that one day our iPads will seem like Atari systems to our kids.

Excerpted from Gym Class Magazine #10, available here.

Wired, June 2012Creative director: Brandon Kavulla, photograph: Chris Buck
Dig the cut-out duct tape logo!!

Wired, June 2012
Creative director: Brandon Kavulla, photograph: Chris Buck

Dig the cut-out duct tape logo!!

Wired, April 2012Cover illustration: Jesse LenzCreative director: Brandon Kavulla, art directors: Alice Choe and Tim Leong

Wired, April 2012
Cover illustration: Jesse Lenz
Creative director: Brandon Kavulla, art directors: Alice Choe and Tim Leong